October 25, 2019

CNN Business – Why CEOs are paid so much

There is no shortage of headlines about CEOs getting paid seriously big money. Last week, for instance, it was revealed that Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella got a 66% raise, bringing his total compensation to nearly $43 million. And this summer Abigail Disney, an heir to the Disney fortune, publicly criticized CEO Bob Iger’s $66 million pay package, which is more than 1,000 times the median pay of Disney employees. While many CEOs are not as generously compensated as Nadella and Iger, they do pretty well. In 2018, the median total compensation for S&P 500 CEOs rose 4% to $12.3 million, according to the latest figures from the Conference Board. CEOs at the high end of that group were paid more than $22 million, while those at the low end were paid roughly $6 million.

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October 25, 2019

The Wall Street Journal – WeWork Employee Options Underwater as Ex-CEO Reaps

Adam Neumann stands to receive up to $1.7 billion as part of a deal with SoftBank Group Corp. to step away from office-space startup WeWork. The company’s employees aren’t doing so well.

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October 25, 2019

CNN Business – A surprising number of companies don’t have a CEO succession plan. Here’s why.

Whether they quit, retire, get fired or die, all CEOs eventually leave. The billion-dollar question is: Who should replace them? The boards of 20% of public companies and 32% of private ones can’t answer that question. That’s because they haven’t discussed long-term succession planning in the past 12 months, according to a survey conducted by the National Association of Corporate Directors.

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September 25, 2019

CFO – Performance-Based Pay Comes Under Fire

The Council of Institutional Investors this month overhauled its policy on executive compensation, urging public companies to dial back the complexity of their pay plans and set longer periods for measuring performance for incentive awards.

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September 12, 2019

NACD Directorship – Reinventing Compensation in Transformative Times

With the onslaught of technological, workforce, economic, and other disruptive forces, no company can afford to be complacent with respect to its executive compensation plans. However, investors take a dim view of perennial changes to executive compensation, citing complexity as a pet peeve.

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